Students gather at Queen’s Park to fight tuition fees

Day of Action

Hundreds of post-secondary students from across the GTA protested at Queen’s Park on Wednesday to fight against high tuition fees in Ontario. (Photo: Tyson Lautenschlager)

By Tyson Lautenschlager and Zachary McGregor

Hundreds of college and university students across Toronto marched towards Queen’s Park on Wednesday with one thing in mind – getting the Ontario government to eliminate tuition fees.

The Canadian Federation of Students’ National Day of Action included more than 35 events across the country.

Gayle McFadden, a representative with the Canadian Federation of Students-Ontario, was happy with the turnout at Queen’s Park.

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McFadden was proud to see so many students making their voices heard at Queen’s Park. (Photo: Tyson Lautenschlager)

“It’s been especially exciting to see folks from outside Toronto coming here to join our voices together at Queen’s Park, and literally bring free education to their doorstep,” said McFadden

McFadden says the organization has three main demands. They want the government to progressively reduce and eliminate tuition fees, convert student loans into non-repayable grants and eliminate interest from existing student loans.

“Ultimately, we’re fighting for free and accessible education for all,” said McFadden. “We believe that education is a right, and it’s a public good,” she said.

McFadden says Ontario’s high tuition fees are indebting an entire generation of students and robbing many of a post-secondary education.

Although the protest had a robust turnout, Humber’s student government is not a member of the CFS and did not participate.

In the past IGNITE has said protests such as this have no relevance to the issues Humber and University of Guelph-Humber students face.

“We are a very diverse community and the issues we face are much different than those of other college,” said Ammar Abdul-Raheem, IGNITE vice president of Student Life. Organizations such as the CFS seem to have difficulty advocating for Humber as a result of its diversity and uniqueness as an institution.

Ammar has also stated the costs associated with being a member of organizations like the CFS outweigh the benefits.

Despite IGNITE’s refusal to participate in the protest, students across the province continue to struggle paying for their education.

One George Brown College student knows she is already in a hole even before completing her schooling.

“I’m in OSAP debt already,” said Carla Rudberg. “Even before I’ve finished my education, I know I’m going to be stuck paying for this the rest of my life.”

While many college and university students felt the need to protest, they weren’t the only ones at Queen’s Park demanding free education.

“This is important because this is going to be my reality next year,” said high school student Michelle Hopkins. “When I’m choosing universities, I have to think about which ones I can afford when I should be thinking about which ones are going to make me the most beneficial person in society.”

While Premier Kathleen Wynne wasn’t present at the protest, Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath was in attendance to talk with students and union leaders

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Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath talked with students and union leaders at the fight for free education (Photo: Tyson Lautenschlager)

“We’re the only party that’s been in this legislature holding the Liberals’ feet to the fire around the rising cost of tuition in this province,” said Horwath.

Ontario has the highest tuition fees in Canada and students are carrying the highest debt loads because of it she said.

“I can tell you I don’t think Patrick Brown and the Conservatives are the answer either. They’ve never asked a question that I can recall about rising tuition fees and the impact it’s having on students,” said Horwath.

Students are often forced to take two or more part-time jobs while still balancing their school work on top of that.

“My education should not cost the same as a down payment on a house,” said Paula Clark, Concurrent Education student at Lakehead University.

But this is often the reality for students paying both their tuition fees and other expenses like rent, food and textbooks.

“Ontario no longer has a public post-secondary education system, we have institutions being funded directly by the public through tuition,” Horwath said.

The CFS will continue lobbying both the provincial and federal governments to lower and eventually eliminate tuition fees.

“This is the largest Student Day of Action we’ve seen in a long time,” McFadden said.

She says students are at their breaking point. They are clearly fed up with high tuition fees, unending debt and demand better.

Congestion near campus city’s responsibility, says Humber

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Highway 27 and Humber College Boulevard is one of the most congested areas around North Campus, and especially during mid-afternoon hours. (Tyson Lautenschlager)

News Reporter

Anyone who’s ever tried to turn left at Highway 27 and Humber College Boulevard knows the agony of a five-minute commute turning into a 15-minute grind.

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Pagenaud to Dixon: “It’s Game On”

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Photo credit: Ashley McCubbin / OnPitRoad.com

By Tyson Lautenschlager

July 17, 2016

Simon Pagenaud goes into the Honda Indy Toronto with a 73-point advantage over Josef Newgarden. However, with Scott Dixon on pole position for the race and fourth in points, it’s Dixon he’s concerned about.

“Dixon’s on pole position, we’re third, so at this point, it’s game on,” Pagenaud told OnPitRoad.com after Sunday morning warmup. “We should probably look at what he’s doing in the race strategy, and maybe mirror that. If he gets caught by a yellow, then we’ll get caught by a yellow, and we don’t lose too many points. In terms of performance and rivalry, we just have to get going and pick up points.”

Pagenaud wound up 14th in the morning warmup after nosing his car into the turn eight tire barriers halfway through the session. Pagenaud had minimal damage, and was able to continue in the session. Despite being on the second half of the speed charts in the warmup, the Frenchman will start inside the top-five of the grid.

“If I wasn’t trying, you guys would be asking me why I’m not trying,” he said. “So, when you go into warmup, you of course want to take some risks in some corners. We had a balance that we we’re trying the red tires, and there was a lot of degradation. We realized that we need to make some adjustments.

“I was just pushing it to see where the tires could take it, and I got my answer. It’s really good actually because we get to make a few changes now, and get back to the race with a chance of winning.”

One of the exciting things about racing in Toronto is the potential for different pit strategies as teams will be deciding between two-stop and three-stop strategies. Being the point leader, Pagenaud finds himself on the defensive side of the championship hunt. He plans to race the drivers in the championship hunt, rather than race others on differing pit strategies.

“You have to decide before the race what your strategy’s going to be because you have to run those red tires once,” he explained. “You can decide whether to run it at the beginning, or at the end – that’s the question. There’s different strategies that could play out. We’re probably going to be on the standard situation for the race because we’re in the title hunt, and we want to fight against our competitors, not someone who might be lucky with a yellow.”

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Check out my other exclusive content from the Honda Indy race weekend including an additional interview with eventual 2016 Verizon IndyCar Series champion, Simon Pagenaud, below.

Human rights head says sex education key lesson

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Nancy Simms, director of the Centre of Human Rights, Equity and Diversity at Humber College says sexual education is important for students in primary schools, especially as it relates to matters of diversity.

Tyson Lautenschlager

NEWS REPORTER

It’s been 18 months since the Ontario Liberals introduced changes to the sexual education curriculum, but the uproar over the highly controversial reform hasn’t died down yet.

The curriculum, which was updated for the first time since 1998 to inform Ontario school children of safe and diverse sexual practices, has been opposed by Conservative Party leader Patrick Brown. He has come under fire in recent weeks for his indecisive approach to whether or not he wants to repeal Premier Kathleen Wynne’s curriculum.

Last week, emails were released that Brown sent to supporters in 2015 promising he would repeal the curriculum, but Brown said in a statement his views have now “evolved.”

Nancy Simms, the director of the Centre for Human Rights, Equity and Diversity at Humber College, said educating young people on issues such as consent, acceptance and LGBTQ issues are especially important as they reach the post-secondary and working worlds.

“In terms of LGBTQ issues, the statistics show there are increasing individuals who identify as a part of the LGBTQQII community,” Simms said.

Simms said the inclusion of diversity ideals are important because all Ontarians have the right to be treated with respect.

“The Wynne government has certainly put the whole notion of working, enabling, supporting and enriching the diverse communities that exist in Ontario,” she said. “I do think if we’re going to be a nation that’s going to be sustainable and competitive, that education certainly needs to start at a really young age in terms of preparing us,” Simms said.

Cora Boccia, a second-year Early Childhood Education student and lesbian, also thinks sex education needs to start early.

“Nowadays, with the media and what’s going on, children are exploring, and they don’t know who they are as a person,” Boccia said.

She says more needs to be done to teach youth in primary schools.

“They should be talking more about LGTBQ intimacies,” Boccia, said. “I feel for earlier generations that LGBTQ topics are coming more about, and they should be more talked about in classes, so parents can understand when their children come out (as queer).”

Vice-President of Ignite Student Life Ammar Abdul-Raheem said educating youth as they reach the college level is important to help students learn how to maintain stronger relationships.

“To me, sexual education is very important,” he said. “It’s important that we know how our bodies work – how to have better and stronger relationships, not just with our sexual partners, but with our friends.”

EDSS adorned in blue; school supports student battling cancer

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Photo: Candace Kuepfer

By Tyson Lautenschlager // Elmira Independent // April 23, 2014

The entire Elmira District Secondary School came together as a community last week to support a fellow Lancer who was set to have surgery to remove the tumour in his tibia bone on Thursday, April 10.

Colton Kuepfer is a Grade 10 student at EDSS. Kuepfer is an athletic student who loves participating in sports, particularly soccer.

When the diagnosis came and the family found out Colton had osteosarcoma, or bone cancer, it was a very emotional time for the Kuepfer family. Continue reading

Why Journalism?

I get asked a lot what made me choose journalism for a career path. If you ask my parents, they would say it’s because I talk a lot, have a lot of opinions and I always think I’m right. Well, they aren’t completely wrong.

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Interviewing Verizon IndyCar Series driver Takuma Sato on 2016 Indianapolis 500 Media Day with my colleague, Ashley McCubbin // Hunter’s Landing, Toronto, May 24, 2016 // Photo: Kreistina Blinova

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